Die NATO bereit zum Syrien-Einsatz? (Update: Stavridis-Zitate)

Steht die NATO bereit für einen Einsatz im Bürgerkriegsland Syrien? Am (gestrigen) Dienstag stand der NATO-Oberbefehlshaber, der US-Admiral James Stavridis, dem Senate Armed Services Committee in Washington Rede und Antwort, und dabei ging es auch um diese Frage. Die Berichterstattung über seine Aussagen variiert ein wenig.

Die russische Nachrichtenagentur RIA Novosti sieht die Allianz auf dem Weg nach Syrien:

Die Nato-Truppen sind laut dem Obersten Nato-Befehlshaber für Europa, Admiral James Stavridis, bereit,  eine Militäroperation in Syrien nach dem libyschen Muster durchzuführen, sollte dies erforderlich sein.

In der Meldung der US-Nachrichtenagentur Associated Press liest sich da etwas, nun, differenzierter:

The top U.S. military commander in Europe said Tuesday that several NATO countries are working on contingency plans for possible military action to end the two-year civil war in Syria as President Bashar Assad’s regime accused U.S.-backed Syrian rebels of using chemical weapons. (…)
Stavridis, who is retiring soon, said a number of NATO nations are looking at a variety of military operations to end the deadlock and assist the opposition forces, including using aircraft to impose a no-fly zone, providing military assistance to the rebels and imposing arms embargoes. (…)
“We are prepared if called upon to be engaged as we were in Libya,” he said.
But within individual member countries, the admiral said, “there’s a great deal of discussion” about lethal support to Syria, no-fly zones, arms embargoes and more. “It is moving individually within the nations, but it has not yet come into NATO as an overall NATO-type approach,” he said.

Laut AP wies Stavridis auch darauf hin, dass ohne Beschluss des UN-Sicherheitsrats und ohne einstimmigen Beschluss der NATO-Mitglieder gar nichts passieren werde.

Zur Ergänzung der Bericht der US-Soldatenzeitung Stars and Stripes: Stavridis: More direct engagement by US could turn tide in Syria

Mit anderen Worten: Geplant wird von einigen Staaten schon; die Voraussetzungen für eine tatsächliche Aktion gibt es nicht.

Was Stavridis im Detail gesagt hat, würde mich zwar interessieren – aber die 392,50 US-Dollar, die für das Transkript seiner Anhörung verlangt werden, sind doch etwas außerhalb meiner Reichweite.

Nachtrag: Dankenswerterweise hat mir ein Leser die für das Thema bedeutsamen Passagen aus einer Abschrift der Anhörung zur Verfügung gestellt:

Extract committee hearing, March 19, of the Senate Committee on Armed Services.
Chair Senator Levin. Other member in the discussion with General Stravidis on Syria were: Senator McCain, Senator Wicker, Senator Shaheen.
Relevant parts:
LEVIN: Admiral, relative to Syria, in your prepared statement, you outlined the impact of the civil war in Syria on certain parts of your AOR. Can you give us some of the NATO or European thinking as to whether or not the alliance should increase its involvement in Syria through direct lethal support to the opposition, possibly the creation of humanitarian buffer zones, and possibly the destruction of Syria’s air defenses, or part of Syria’s air defenses?
STAVRIDIS: Sir, as we all know, the Syrian situation continues to become worse and worse and worse — 70,000 killed, a million refugees pushed out of the country, probably 2.5 million internally displaced. No end in sight to a vicious civil war.
The alliance has taken a position that it will follow the same sequence that was used in Libya, which is to say prior to NATO involvement, there would have to be a U.N. Security Council resolution, regional agreement, and agreement among the 28 nations.
So within NATO channels, what we are focused on is defending that border with Syria. And as you alluded to, Chairman, in your statement, we’ve moved Patriot missiles down to do that.
In terms of what else is happening on an individual nation-by- nation basis, there’s a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned — lethal support, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, et cetera. It is moving individually within the nations, but it has not yet come into NATO as an overall NATO-type approach. The NATO piece at the moment, again, is focused defensively, planning, being prepared, but the movement at the moment is in the individual national capitals.
LEVIN: And finally, does that movement include at least some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of Syria’s air defense?
STAVRIDIS: Yes.
***
MCCAIN: Admiral Stavridis, last year at this hearing I asked if we — the North Atlantic Council had directed NATO to do any contingency planning, whatever for possible NATO involvement in Syria. Is NATO doing any military planning now for any potential Syria contingencies?
STAVRIDIS: Sir, we are. We are looking at a wide range of operations, and we are prepared if called upon to be engaged as — as we were in Libya.
MCCAIN: As you know, the NATO has deployed Patriot missile batteries to southern Turkey, barely — to defend Turkey against contingencies in Syria. Are those Patriot missiles capable of shooting down aircraft?
MCCAIN: Are they capable of shooting down scud missiles?
STAVRIDIS: Yes, sir, they are.
MCCAIN: Are they effective in a 20-mile range?
STAVRIDIS: Yes, sir.
MCCAIN: Can they be positioned in southern Turkey in such a way they could shoot down some of Assad’s aircraft?
STAVRIDIS: Depending on range and altitude, yes, sir.
MCCAIN: Would you agree that shooting down a few Syrian aircraft, it would serve as a powerful disincentive for pilots to fly in that area?
STAVRIDIS: I think that whenever aircraft are shot down that is a powerful disincentive.
MCCAIN: Is it your opinion, Admiral, that it is time that we help the Syrian opposition in ways that would break what is a prolonged civil war?
STAVRIDIS: I think that that option should be an is being activity explored by all the nations who are looking at this.
MCCAIN: Could I ask you personal opinion?
STAVRIDIS: You can. My personal opinion is that would be helpful in breaking the deadlock and bringing down the Assad regime.
MCCAIN: I thank you.
***
Senator Wicker?
WICKER: Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Admiral Stavridis, let me do a little followup. Senator Donnelly just asked if and when Assad falls, and you discussed his question about ethnic cleansing. If and when Assad falls, does EUCOM or NATO have contingency plans to deal with the Syrian stockpile of chemical weapons?
STAVRIDIS: EUCOM does not. That would fall under General Mattis and U.S. Central Command.
***
LEVIN:
Admiral, let me ask you some questions about Syria. The — I think the administration has shown some caution, real caution about getting more deeply involved militarily in terms of supplying arms, particularly to the opposition in Syria.
I think the fear has been that we want to make sure who those arms are getting to, first of all, and secondly that when Assad falls — I won’t say if and when, because it’s “when” as far as I’m concerned, Assad falls, there needs to be in place or ready to be put in place by the Syrians some kind of an interim government, which would avoid chaos and anarchy in Syria so that it doesn’t fall apart; it doesn’t disintegrate; and that progress needs to be made in that direction prior to the provision of — of more lethal arms. That seems to have been the feeling of the administration.
I understand that caution and have basically shared it with a couple of caveats. One is that if Turkey were willing to provide a safe zone inside — or to assure a safe zone with NATO support along the border with Syria, but inside Syria — if Turkey were willing to do that, that I think that we ought to support that.
Secondly, I’ve favored at least consideration of going after some of Syria’s air defenses and possibly some of their air capability itself.
LEVIN: We heard an interesting idea today, probably not from his kind for the first time. I think Senator McCain is probably further along in this line than perhaps most of our colleagues. I thought it was a very intriguing set of questions of his when he asked about the capability of the Patriot missiles, as to whether or not they essentially could defend a zone along that border, perhaps 20 miles wide, from Syrian aircraft from Turkish territory with the Patriot missiles. And your answers were very — it seems to me illuminating that yes there could be that kind of protection of a — I think you indicated or he indicated — a 20 mile wide zone or not.

And I think that really is subject to some very serious consideration, myself, because I think we have to step up the military — our — our military effort against Assad in some ways, whether it’s some kind of a safe zone that we help protect along the border inside of Syria, whether it’s going after their air defenses, or whether it’s going after some of their air force.
Would Turkey, do you believe, support the use of the Patriot missiles in that manner to help protect a safe zone in Turkey — I’m sorry — in Syria along that border?
STAVRIDIS: Again, I’m not expert on — on Syria. From the perspective of the — our Turkish colleagues, whenever they have talked to us about the use of the Patriots, they have been very emphatic that they would be defensive. That’s the — the role they have continued to say is paramount in their view, because I think they are loathe to be dragged into the Syrian conflict by an inadvertent incident of some kind.
Having said that, as I told Senator McCain, the capability is there. It would have to be first and foremost a Turkish decision, since it’s there sovereign soil. If it were to be a NATO mission, it would then need to come into NATO for dialogue and so forth. And, as I was discussing with Senator Wicker, that’ll require 28 nation consensus.
So, it would be a complicated process, but I think this range of options are certainly under discussion in a lot of the capitals.
LEVIN: Would you — would you take back that option if it isn’t already under consideration to the — our NATO allies, starting with Turkey?
Turkey has suggested, I believe, that she would be willing to help create and then protect a zone, a narrow band inside of Syria along the Turkish border, where Syrians could go for safety instead of all flowing across the border. So it’d be, I think, an interesting — obviously important and essential — but interesting to find what the — Turkey’s response would be to such a proposal.
And if there is a positive response there or willingness to even consider it, can you take that up with other NATO countries and the possible use of those Patriots?
STAVRIDIS: Yes, sir.
LEVIN: Because I — I think it’s a — kind of a real possibility that we ought to explore.
STRAVIDIS: Now, then to follow up on Senator McCain. He had an interesting line of questioning with regard to the placement of Patriot batteries in Turkey. Who put those Patriot batteries there, Admiral?
STAVRIDIS: Those are on NATO mission. They were assigned by the NATO alliance. There are three nations that have contributed batteries. The United States is in a place called Gaziantep. Germany is in a place called Kahramanmaras. And the Dutch are in place called Adana. All of these are located in southwestern Turkey along the border, Senator.
WICKER: OK. And was this a decision that — that was reached by the NATO leadership? Or did we do that individually with — with those two allies of ours?
STAVRIDIS: It was a NATO decision and this is a NATO mission. In fact, although those are the three nations that have contributed the actual batteries, the entire 28 member nations have people that are part of this mission. For example, the command and control is made up of people from all the different countries, connected back through the operational chain into headquarters. So it’s very much a NATO mission.
WICKER: What did it take within NATO to make that decision?

STAVRIDIS: We had to bring it into the NATO Council, which is 28 nations. They’re represented by ambassadors in Belgium. It was discussed there. Then those ambassadors went back to capitals, got approval for it, and then the operational task began.
I — I would say that sounds like quite a process, but…
WICKER: It does.
STAVRIDIS: … well, but we did it in about a month. In other words, from the time the Turkish nation asked for the Patriots to be in place to the time the first Patriot batteries were in place was just about a month.
WICKER: What level of unanimity was required within NATO to do that?
STAVRIDIS: All 28 nations had to agree.
WICKER: OK. So, do I take it, then, from the tone of your answer that you’re — you’re comfortable with our having to rely on that level of required consensus in our past dealings with the Libyan issue and currently with Syria? Or has that been cumbersome? And has it stood in the way of us making efficient decisions?
STAVRIDIS: As I look back on four years as the NATO commander for operations, I look at all the things we’ve done — Afghanistan, counter-piracy, the current Syria mission with the Patriots, the Balkans. We’ve typically got 150,000 people out doing five or six operations around the world at any given moment. All of those decisions have been done by consensus.
There have been times when that has been frustrating and there have been times when it takes consensus-building, just like it does in any deliberative body. But as I look back on four years, I would say that it is reasonably effective at delivering operational capability.
Having said all that, there are always going to be times when each nation must reserve to itself the right to act immediately. The United States has done that. I think we will continue to do that. We’re not bound by NATO, but when we want to bring NATO along, we go into this process and, again, looking back on four years, it’s been reasonably successful in delivering capability for operations.
WICKER: The United States has not done that, though, with regard to Syria policy.
STAVRIDIS: It has not done that with regard to Syria. That’s correct. It did it with regard to Libya, for example.
WICKER: In what respect?
STAVRIDIS: In the sense that the Libyan operation began as a series of unilateral coalition-of-the-willing operations, initially the French and the British. U.S. jumped in. Italians came in. At that point after about 10 days to two weeks of that coalition-of-the- willing operation, NATO stepped up and took over that operation and then ran the Libyan operation for the next nine months.
WICKER: Now, with regard to Senator McCain’s specific question about those Patriot batteries being used to knock down Syrian military aircraft, at this point our position is that that would require this type of NATO consensus decision.
STAVRIDIS: That’s correct. That is correct.
WICKER: And we’re far from that.
STAVRIDIS: That is correct.
***
LEVIN: Thank you very much, Senator King.

We’re going to have a brief second round. I think one of our colleagues is on her way here also, so she can have her first round, of course, when she gets here.
Admiral, let me ask you some questions about Syria. The — I think the administration has shown some caution, real caution about getting more deeply involved militarily in terms of supplying arms, particularly to the opposition in Syria.
I think the fear has been that we want to make sure who those arms are getting to, first of all, and secondly that when Assad falls — I won’t say if and when, because it’s “when” as far as I’m concerned, Assad falls, there needs to be in place or ready to be put in place by the Syrians some kind of an interim government, which would avoid chaos and anarchy in Syria so that it doesn’t fall apart; it doesn’t disintegrate; and that progress needs to be made in that direction prior to the provision of — of more lethal arms. That seems to have been the feeling of the administration.
I — I understand that caution and have basically shared it with a couple of caveats. One is that if Turkey were willing to provide a safe zone inside — or to assure a safe zone with NATO support along the border with Syria, but inside Syria — if Turkey were willing to do that, that I think that we ought to support that.
STAVRIDIS: I — I can. I — I’d actually start by looking back for a moment. If we look back 10 to 15 years ago, we saw disaster in the Balkans, comparable to what we see in Syria today. In that period of time, we saw 8,000 men and boys killed, in Srebrenica, a matter of days. We saw genocide. A saw 100,000 people killed, millions pushed across borders, two major wars.
Flash forward to today. Instead of reaching for a gun to resolve a dispute in the Balkans today, the nations are reaching for the telephone. They are under the auspices of the European Union. As you allude to, Senator, we see Kosovo and Serbia at the table. They’re prime ministers at the table. They’re presidents at the table, led by Baroness Catherine Ashton the European Union’s head of foreign affairs, if you will.
I think, we’re very close to a — a — a real settlement between Kosovo and Serbia. That will allow us to draw down our forces in KFOR Kosovo. Today we have about 6,000 there. When I came into the job four years ago, we had 15,000. That’s, in and of itself, a sign of real progress. If the talks bear fruit, I think we’ll be able to drive that force down as early as late this year. So, stay tuned. I think there’s more progress ahead in the Balkans.
SHAHEEN: That’s very encouraging. It’s also encouraging to think that, hopefully, if we’re 15 years out from the current crisis in Syria, that we might see some similar progress, which would…
STAVRIDIS: Hopefully faster, but, yes, I agree.

 

(Foto: Stavridis in Finnland im Mai 2012 – Department of Defense Photo)

38 Kommentare zu „Die NATO bereit zum Syrien-Einsatz? (Update: Stavridis-Zitate)“

  • Crass Spektakel   |   20. März 2013 - 18:27

    exkurs, bonner landgericht bejaht Einzelermittlungen zum Tanklaster-Bombardement. Ich denke TW wird darauf noch eingehen, bis dahin Tante Google fragen.

  • b   |   20. März 2013 - 18:33

    Pat Lang war Chef der “human intelligence” Seite der U.S. Militärspionage und hat
    lange Zeit im Nahen Osten gearbeitet. Seine Einschätzung der Situation:

    The US is helping build an Islamic Emirate in Syria

    Lurking in the article are a couple of unfortunate truths:

    – American government personnel are training Islamist fighters in Jordan and possibly Turkey.

    – American government liaison people are mouthing the line that there are good islamists and then there are bad Islamists. We have been doing that kind of thing for a decade. Egypt seems to have taught us nothing. Lang’s Postulate – “Islamist governments ALWAYS want just two things. These are attainment and retention of absolute power, and creations of a sharia law state.”

    The bottom line is that the US is now participating in the creation of a sharia law state in Syria,

    Wir sollten bei diesem wahnsinnigem Vorhaben nicht mitmachen.

  • Crass Spektakel   |   20. März 2013 - 18:46

    ontopic: “Mit anderen Worten: Geplant wird von einigen Staaten schon; die Voraussetzungen für eine tatsächliche Aktion gibt es nicht.”

    Und das ist gut so. Ein Planungsstab der nicht plant wäre reichlich plan- und sinnlos. Grundsätzlich sollte sich eine Militärallianz von der Größe der NATO schon zu Übungszwecken mit der Planung halbwegs realistischer Optionen befassen und mit Sicherheit wetzen sich die Schlapphüte zum Thema Syrien schon seit Monaten die Hacken ab, egal ob es nur um eine Übersicht der Akteure oder die Situation der BC-Waffen geht.

  • chickenhawk   |   20. März 2013 - 18:50

    Laut AP wies Stavridis auch darauf hin, dass ohne Beschluss des UN-Sicherheitsrats und ohne einstimmigen Beschluss der NATO-Mitglieder gar nichts passieren werde.

    Eine entscheidende Einschränkung, welche den Äußerungen von Admiral Stavridis die Brisanz nimmt.

  • Wanderer   |   20. März 2013 - 19:25

    Ich denke, dass sich die Meldung auf seine Aussage vor dem zuständigen Senatsausschuss am Montag bezieht. Dort hat McCain aufgrund seiner persönlichen Agenda zu der Thematik Syrien einige Fragen gestellt und nach Stavridis persönlicher Meinung gefragt. Er hat dabei auch nochmal den defensiven Charakter von Active Fence Turkey betont. Es ging wohl auch eher um das “Wie” als das “Ob”

    Kann man auch hier sich nochmal anschauen (kostenlos ;)):

    http://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings/event.cfm?eventid=2071a73cf15080ce23bf264b31d6f95e&autostart=true

  • JCR   |   20. März 2013 - 19:31

    Gegen Planungen ist grundsätzlich nichts einzuwenden, die USA hatten auch noch bis in die 30er Jahre Pläne zum Eroberungskrieg gegen Kanada ;)

  • Wolfgang   |   20. März 2013 - 21:12

    > Gegen Planungen ist grundsätzlich nichts einzuwenden, die USA hatten auch noch bis in die 30er Jahre Pläne zum Eroberungskrieg gegen Kanada ;)

    Woher “weiß” man, dass die USA diese Pläne aufgegeben haben?

  • Memoria   |   20. März 2013 - 21:17

    Umfangreiche Eventuallfallplanungen und Kriegsspiele waren ja mal eine deutsche Erfindung, aber ich zweifel daran dass bei “several NATO countries are working on contingency plans for possible military action to end the two-year civil war in Syria” auch BMVg SE gemeint ist.

  • chickenhawk   |   20. März 2013 - 22:47

    JCR | 20. März 2013 – 19:31
    Gegen Planungen ist grundsätzlich nichts einzuwenden, die USA hatten auch noch bis in die 30er Jahre Pläne zum Eroberungskrieg gegen Kanada ;)

    Die US-Planungen für einen militärischen Konflikt mit dem Britischen Empire und Kanada aus den 30er Jahren (»Warplan Red«) wurden erst 1974 bekannt, als die Geheimhaltung aufgehoben wurde. Das erregte seinerzeit einiges Aufsehen bei den nördlichen Nachbarn. Hintergrund war, dass man in den USA eine Zeit lang befürchtete, es könnte in Großbritannien zu einen Umsturz durch linke Kräfte kommen (deswegen auch »Red«).

    Aber die Kanadier planten auch für einen Einmarsch in die USA (»Defence Scheme No. 1«). Für die Planungen zeichnete ein kanadischer Oberstleutnant verantwortlich, der zu diesem Zwecke undercover Erkundungsreisen in die Vereinigten Staaten unternahm. Das ganze trug aber bisweilen eher komödiantische Züge.

  • Crass Spektakel   |   21. März 2013 - 11:01

    Einmarsch USA-Kanada: Erinnert mich an die Studie der Universität Wien im Auftrag des österreichischen Verteidigungsministeriums zum Thema “Was tun bei Ausbruch einer Zombieplage”.

  • Wolfgang   |   21. März 2013 - 11:37

    > Einmarsch USA-Kanada: Erinnert mich an die Studie der Universität Wien im Auftrag des österreichischen Verteidigungsministeriums zum Thema “Was tun bei Ausbruch einer Zombieplage”.

    Also die Bundeswehr ist jedenfalls auf Zombies nicht vorbereitet:

    [Und dieses Blog weiterhin nicht auf Verleger-Links... danke. T.W.]

  • T.Wiegold   |   21. März 2013 - 12:19

    Hey, wir machen jetzt bitte hier keinen Zombie-Thread auf (irgendwann landen wir bei der Frage, ob das GG solche Einsätze zulässt und ähnlicher Blödsinn…).

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 15:37

    Die NATO bereit zum Syrien-Einsatz? Natürlich ist sie bereit. Was wäre das für ein Militärbündnis, was nicht ständig bereit zu militärischen Schlägen wäre? Es wäre eine Luftnummer. Ein Einsatz ist von der Führungsmacht USA seit langer Zeit geplant. Syrien steht schon ewig auf der schwarzen Liste. Entsprechende Dokumente wurden im Internet veröffentlicht. Und bisher wurde immer gemacht was die die USA wollte. Es muß nur noch ein geeigneter Anlass geschaffen werden. Die bisherigen Versuche, wie Massaker in Syrien und Granaten auf die Türkei wurden leider als inszeniert aufgedeckt und waren stümperhaft erfolglos, da sie nicht wirklich dem syrischen Regime angelastet werden konnten. Mit dem C-Waffeneinsatz wird es vermutlich ähnlich laufen.

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 15:49

    @T.Wiegold | 21. März 2013 – 12:19
    Hat sich etwas an den Regeln geändert? Darf man in diesem Blog wieder deutsche Medien ungerügt zitieren und verlinken?

  • Wolfgang   |   21. März 2013 - 15:57

    Ups sorry, das mit dem Link hatte ich vergessen gehabt …

  • Wolfgang   |   21. März 2013 - 15:58

    > Mit dem C-Waffeneinsatz wird es vermutlich ähnlich laufen.

    Also wenn ich die Ruhe richtig beurteile dann waren das mit den C-Waffen die Rebellen. Sonst hätten wir wahrscheinlich schon einen Krieg.

  • califax   |   21. März 2013 - 16:26

    Ich glaube eher, da herrscht gerade bei allen ganz große Verwirrung.
    Insbesondere hatte wohl Obama nicht ernsthaft vor, tatsächlich in Syrien Krieg zu führen, zumal sich jetzt mit dem Frackingboom gerade eine elegante Möglichkeit bietet, einen ordentlichen Teil des Nahostärgers an China und die EU weiterzureichen.

    Assad ist der Einsatz zuzutrauen. Dann wäre das ein Wetterballon gewesen, um zu testen, was denn bei einem richtigen Einsatz an Reaktionen zu erwarten wäre.
    Die Aufständischen könnten ihrerseits versuchen, die NATO noch weiter in den Konflikt hineinzuziehen, indem sie eine Beutewaffe abfeuern.

    Und wenn man nicht selber ein paar Angestellte vor Ort hat sondern in Deutschland vorm Webblog sitzt, hat man eh keine Ahnung, was konkret gerade los ist.

    Hat eigentlich irgendjemand anhand der Beschreibungen eine Idee, was für ein Stoff da freigesetzt worden sein könnte?

  • BausC   |   21. März 2013 - 16:28

    Die Zeit titelt zu diesem Thema generell aber auch insbesondere zu Syrien mit der Überschrift:

    “Wir tun doch nix …”

    21.03.2013

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 16:45

    @califax | 21. März 2013 – 16:26
    Wir werden vermutlich bald wissen von wem was eingesetzt wurde. Und aus welchen Beständen der eingesetzte Stoff stammt. Angeblich soll dies bei chemischen Stoffen gut feststellbar sein. Russland will an der Klärung des Vorfalls teilnehmen und hat die Entsendung von Experten angeboten. Ich hoffe das Ergebnis lautet nicht erneut, die Waffen stammen aus NATO-Beständen oder Beständen von Verbündeten.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 17:00

    @ Stefan
    Und aus welchen Beständen der eingesetzte Stoff stammt.

    Es dürfte schon schwer werden, den Einsatz von Giftgas überhaupt nachzuweisen. Agent 15, das ziemlich wahrscheinlich im Dezember von der syrischen Armee eingesetzt wurde, läßt sich wohl nichtmal mit Gewebeproben nachweisen.

    Und aus welchen Beständen, außer jenen der Syrischen Armee, soll der schon stammen? Entweder aus einer eroberten Kaserne, oder eben dem Assad-Vorrat.

    Assad folgt weiterhin seiner Linie, dass er das kleinere Übel sei, und greift dazu in die Bewährte Alles-islamistische-Terroristen-Propagandakiste. Umgekehrt dürfte den Rebellen dürfte jedes Mittel recht sein, die internaitonale Aufmerksamkeit auf den Konflikt zu lenken.

    Und auf eine unabhängige Ermittlung braucht man gar nicht erst hoffen. Das Regime läßt weder unabhängige Reporter noch Hilfslieferung in die Konfliktregionen.

    @ califax
    Es gibt trotz allem Leute, die von vor Ort berichten. Nur muss man denen auch zuhören wollen.

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 18:02

    @J.R. | 21. März 2013 – 17:00

    Zitat: “Und auf eine unabhängige Ermittlung braucht man gar nicht erst hoffen. Das Regime läßt weder unabhängige Reporter noch Hilfslieferung in die Konfliktregionen. ”

    Es gibt also dort keine unabhängige Reporter.

    Zitat: “Es gibt trotz allem Leute, die von vor Ort berichten. Nur muss man denen auch zuhören wollen.”

    Es gibt sie also doch. Ja was nun?

    Sie meinen doch nicht den Tante-Emma-Laden eines Hauptschülers, so ganz vor Ort in London, genannt “Beobachtungsstelle für Menschenrechte”.

    Eine unabhängige Ermittlung ist auch nicht die Kompetenz von Reportern oder Hilfsorganisationen, sondern von Experten für chemische Kampfstoffe. Und die Syrer werden die Russen schon dort untersuchen lassen.

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 18:25

    @J.R. | 21. März 2013 – 17:00
    Auf Antrag der Regierung in Damaskus wird die Uno Ermittlungen zum mutmaßlichen Einsatz von Chemiewaffen durch syrische Rebellen aufnehmen. Das kündigte UN-Generalsekretär Ban Ki-moon heute an. Es muß also doch viel nachweisbar sein.

  • T.Wiegold   |   21. März 2013 - 18:41

    @Stefan

    Hatte den Link in der Eile übersehen, ist jetzt gelöscht. Weiterhin gilt: keine Links auf deutsche Verleger-Webseiten, mit der – derzeit – einzigen Ausnahme SpOn.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 18:45

    @ Stefan
    Genauer lesen. ;)
    Das Syrische Regime hat nach Beginn der Unruhen die meisten ausländischen Reporter ausgewiesen. Trotzdem gibt es noch Syrer die über die Lage vor Ort berichten, und eben auch ausländische Reporter, die inoffiziell aus dem Land berichten. Timo Vogt beispielsweise kennt man hier ja schon durch seine Afghanistan-Berichte. Ist halt nicht ganz harmlos, erst recht für die Syrer (Reporter ohne Grenzen kommt für 2012 auf 17 getötete Journalisten, 44 getötete Blogger und Bürgerjournalisten und vier getötete Medienmitarbeiter).

  • T.Wiegold   |   21. März 2013 - 18:58

    @all

    Zur Info: Siehe Nachtrag oben.

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 19:32

    @J.R. | 21. März 2013 – 18:45
    Zitat: “Das Syrische Regime hat nach Beginn der Unruhen die meisten ausländischen Reporter ausgewiesen.”

    Das ist bei militärischen Konflikten durchaus üblich und wird von den NATO-Staaten nicht anders gemacht. Ich möchte hierzu nur beispielhaft an die französische Praxis dazu im Mali-Krieg erinnern.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 19:38

    @ Stefan
    Muss ich ja nicht gut finden (und Gegenbeispiel wäre beispielsweise Afghanistan).

    Aber auch die Franzosen und Amerikaner schießen Reportern nicht in den Kopf oder foltern Blogger.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 19:52

    Ach ja, eine nette Zusammenfassung wer wie was aus Syrien berichtet hat es bei der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung: Männer, die auf Leichen starren. Wie unser Bild vom Krieg in Syrien entsteht

  • Stefan   |   21. März 2013 - 19:54

    @J.R. | 21. März 2013 – 18:45
    Zitat: “Ist halt nicht ganz harmlos, erst recht für die Syrer (Reporter ohne Grenzen kommt für 2012 auf 17 getötete Journalisten, 44 getötete Blogger und Bürgerjournalisten und vier getötete Medienmitarbeiter).”

    Im Krieg steben immer auch Journalisten. Kein Staat und keine Armee der Welt kann in einem Krieg exclusiv die Sicherheit von Journalisten gewährleisten. Es sind ja auch nur verletzliche Menschen. Das ist auch, neben der militärischen Geheimhaltung, ein Grund um diese aus dem Kriegsgebiet zu verweisen.

    Sie haben vergessen zu erwähnen, wer diese Journalisten getötet hat. Die 4 Medienmitarbeiter wurden z. B. zweifelsfrei von den von uns unterstützten Rebellen bei einem Anschlag auf einen syrischen Fernsehsender getötet.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 20:36

    @ Stefan
    Steht u.a. oben im Link der BpB.

    Und auch Reporter ohne Grenzen, von denen die Zahlen stammen, nimmt eine eindeutige Gewichtung vor:
    “Die Gewalt, mit der das Regime von Baschar al-Assad gegen Aufständische vorgeht, traf Journalisten und Blogger als Zeugen der Bluttaten schwer. Doch auch bewaffnete Oppositionelle, die ebenfalls kaum Kritik dulden, griffen Journalisten an und diffamierten sie als Spione.”

    Aber in Ihren Augen gibt es ja keinen Bürgerkrieg, und Russland ist ein unabhängiger Beobachter. Von daher hat sich (wieder mal) die Diskussion erledigt.

    Und btw., zwischen “Sicherheit nicht gewährleisten” und “foltern und hinrichten” ist ein himmelsweiter Unterschied.

  • Wolfgang   |   21. März 2013 - 20:40

    > Hat eigentlich irgendjemand anhand der Beschreibungen eine Idee, was für ein Stoff da freigesetzt worden sein könnte?

    Das kann ziemlich vieles sein http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemische_Waffe – einfach mal die “Chlor”-Vorkommen durchsuchen. Im Grunde kann es aber auch ein einfacher Unfall gewesen sein. Wenn die irgendwo Chlor gelagert haben/hatten und das in den Krieswirren vergessen wurde, dann genügt die Explosion einer normalen Druckflasche. Und sowas gibt es wohl auch hier zum Beispiel in Schwimmbädern.

    > Zitat: “Es gibt trotz allem Leute, die von vor Ort berichten. Nur muss man denen auch zuhören wollen.”

    Das Problem ist nur, dass ein Blog im Kriegsgebiet schnell auch als “Verrat” angesehen werden kann. Und ich würde mich im Ernstfall nicht immer darauf verlassen, dass die Soldaten dann einem korrekt die Rechte vorlesen und einen bitten die Berichterstattung zu lassen.

    Außerdem bezweifle ich, dass ein Blogger im Kriegsgebiet in der Lage ist einen eventuellen Chemiewaffeneinsatz zu untersuchen. Also ein ganz klein wenig mehr als ein Chemiebaukasten ist da schon nötig, neben der Erlaubnis sich in dem Bereich überhaupt aufhalten zu dürfen.

    > Wir werden vermutlich bald wissen von wem was eingesetzt wurde. Und aus welchen Beständen der eingesetzte Stoff stammt. Angeblich soll dies bei chemischen Stoffen gut feststellbar sein.

    Eher nein. Es gibt zwar verschiedene natürliche und künstliche “chemische Fingerabdrücke” (einfach nach dem Begriff suchen) und wenn die vorhanden oder beigemischt sind, dann kommt man schon weiter, aber Assad hat ja das Zeug auch selbst hergestellt. Und was ist wenn dort schon jemand in der Produktion abgezweigt hat, was weiß man dann?

    Darüber hinaus gibt es im Kriegswaffenkontrollgesetz eine sehr intensiv genutze Gesetzelücke. Hier können nämlich die Seriennummern in die Waffen eingelasert werden und diese lassen sich im Gegensatz zu mechanisch eingeschlagenen Nummer sehr leicht entfernen. Wir können also davon ausgehen, dass man nur dann eine Spur nach x findet, wenn der Täter will, dass man sie findet.

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 21:03

    @ Wolfgang
    Klar ist das Verfolgen von kritischen Berichtererstattern in Bürgerkriegen und Diktaturen ein Problem. Aber Syrien ist ein modernes Land mit Internetanbindung, und über stille Mailboxen und soziale Netzwerke läßt sich da einiges an Material außer Landes bringen.

    Vom sehr wahrscheinlichen Agent 15-Einsatz im Dezember (Foreign Policy: Secret State Department cable: Chemical weapons used in Syria) finden Sie zum Beispiel Zitate aus dem Bericht der US-Untersuchung (“We can’t definitely say 100 percent, but Syrian contacts made a compelling case that Agent 15 was used in Homs on Dec. 23″), die Symptombeschreibung und Einschätzung durch mehrere Ärzte und eines Neurologen vor Ort, und mehrere YouTube-Videos.

    Und die Reaktion des US-Außenministeriums auf den Bericht macht halt sehr klar, dass die USA kein Interesse an einer Intervention in Syrien haben. Die hatten sie auch nicht während der Irak-Besatzung, in deren Verlauf von den Regimes in Syrien und Iran geschickte Kämpfer und Waffen wiederholt Amerikaner töteten.

  • Wolfgang   |   21. März 2013 - 21:27

    > Und die Reaktion des US-Außenministeriums auf den Bericht macht halt sehr klar, dass die USA kein Interesse an einer Intervention in Syrien haben.

    Ich bin mittlerweile sogar davon überzeugt, dass die USA ganz bewußt auf den Erstschlag von der anderen Seite warten, wer sich auch immer als solche definiert. Die haben in Pearl Habour ihre gesamte Flotte verloren aber danach hatten die alle hinter sich gebracht, es wurde nicht mehr über Krieg – Ja/Nein – diskutiert, sondern nur noch über das wie. Obamas Plan ist ein Pearl Harbour, wobei das durchaus von den Verlusten her deutlich kleiner ausfallen darf. Es muss nur klar sein, dass die anderen angefangen haben.

    Und mit den wichtigsten Part in der Rolle spielt Israel, denn die sind offenbar bereit sich einem nuklearen Erstschlag ausszusetzen. Die setzen alles auf ihr SDI und auf ihre Patriots und was auch immer.

  • Jux   |   21. März 2013 - 21:41

    Die Ausschusssitzung gibt es auf C-Span (amerikanisches Phoenix) auf der man auch alle anderen öffentlichen Veranstaltung der US Regierung findet.Das Protokoll basiert allerdings auf Untertiteln und ist daher ohne Namensnennung des jeweiligen Sprechers. Aber z.B. eine Suche nach Syria gibt 32:29 des Videos an – das dann die Ausführungen des Generals enthält.

  • T.Wiegold   |   21. März 2013 - 23:17

    So ganz nebenbei: Hat sich mal jemand den Nachtrag mit den Fragen der US-Senatoren und den Antworten von Stavridis durchgelesen? Und wie ich auch den Eindruck bekommen, dass manche Senatoren – zumindest in diesem Fall – das Ganze mit der einhelligen Beschlussfassung in der NATO für ziemlichen Blödsinn halten? (Vielleicht haben die auch nur die NATO nicht verstanden.)

  • J.R.   |   21. März 2013 - 23:29

    Der Guardian hat heute einen sehr interessanten Artikel über das Brown Moses Blog mit Schwerpunkt Waffen im Syrien-Konflikt. (Unter anderem mit dem Nachweis des Einsatzes von Cluster- und Barrel-Bombs durch die Syrische Armee, oder von europäischen Raketenwerfen in den Händen jihadistischer Gruppen.)

    Auch beeindruckend ist die Auflistung von einigen hundert Videochannels nach Stadt und Stadtteil.

  • Wanderer   |   22. März 2013 - 8:18

    @TW: Das Gefühl kann ich bestätigen. Wenn man in der aktuellen Anhörung sich die Aussagen zur Thematik Raketenabwehr durchliest, dann wird manchmal deutlich, dass es manchen Senatoren schwerfällt zwischen den verschiedenen Zuständigkeiten zu unterscheiden.

    Auch in älteren Anhörungen in denen Stavridis anwesend war, musste er die Senatoren des Öfteren auf Verfahren der NATO hinweisen. In Bezug auf Afghanistan hat er mal darauf hingewiesen, dass er dies aus der Sicht des SACEUR und NATO sieht und nicht für CENTCOM sprechen kann.

    Und ganz großes Chaos kommt bei der Thematik Bengazi auf. Nicht nur wir haben Probleme mit Zuständigkeiten ;).

  • Wolfgang   |   22. März 2013 - 12:50

    > Und wie ich auch den Eindruck bekommen, dass manche Senatoren – zumindest in diesem Fall – das Ganze mit der einhelligen Beschlussfassung in der NATO für ziemlichen Blödsinn halten? (Vielleicht haben die auch nur die NATO nicht verstanden.)

    Die Amerikaner stehen doch seit Anfang 2012 unter Kriegsrecht. Ich meinte zwar, es wäre noch im Dezember 2011 unterschrieben worden, doch auf der offiziellen Seite findet sich der März 2012.

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/03/16/executive-order-national-defense-resources-preparedness

    Ich glaube eher, dass die NATO nach dem ersten Schusswechsel gleichgeschaltet werden wird. Sie ist dann nur noch Befehlsempfänger. Von daher sind die Strukturen der Nato für US-Senatoren wenig interessant.